Posts tagged ‘countryside’

August 12, 2017

Day Trip to Young

Today I did a day trip to a town famous for cherries which had been recommended to me by a childhood friend. Yes, I am talking about the town of Young in NSW which is roughly two hours drive from Canberra. I set off around 8.30AM and drove along the Barton and Hume highways before going onto country roads. There were a couple of potholes here and there but overall it was a pretty smooth drive. Soon green fields and crops appeared, as did fluffy white sheep and cattle grazing on the fields beside the road. I spied the bright green and red of rosellas and saw a flash of white as a sulphur crested cockatoo soared overhead.

After about two hours, I was in Young! I passed a sign adorned with cherries (a motif I would see repeated everywhere) and parked at the well-sign-posted and easy to find information centre, which was housed in what appeared to be a rather historical-looking building. I entered through the doors and was greeted by wonderfully friendly staff. I received a map of the town and was asked if there was anything in particular I would like to see. I said I was interested in the museum I had seen a sign for further down the road. The lady helpfully explained the way there and circled the location on the map for me. She also circled a nearby park and said there was a good cafe’ behind the museum.

I thanked her and had a look around the information centre. I picked up some leaflets about Young and other regions in NSW. Then I bought a postcard of Young, some cherry jam and a bottle of pinot noir I saw in the wine cellar. After depositing the goods in my car, I milled around the art gallery which had free admission. There were lots of pretty works of art to be seen, including still life and landscapes but with figures in the pictures. My favourite picture was of two men looking out to a glorious sunset with their dogs at their side. I thought it was brilliant.

Then I left my car in the 2P free car park and set off on a walk around the town. I passed a playground and stopped off at a fudge factory. I saw loads of lollies but settled on a chocolate cherry liqueur, sticky date and butter pecan fudge pieces respectively. They came all nicely wrapped up in a little box and in a pretty pink and white striped bag. I continued my way around the town and read lots of information signs about historical buildings including the bank and old school which is now a museum. I also bought an oil burner and a nice romantic fiction book. I eventually completed my journey around the town and ended up where I had began. Then I bought a 1.5L bottle of water from IGA and put the street address of the museum into my GPS as I didn’t quite know my way well enough around the town just yet.

It led me straight to the museum where I parked my car. It was now about lunch time so I decided to have lunch first and then visit the museum; I wasn’t in a hurry after all. I bought a cappuccino in a mug and a slice of someone’s mum’s famous carrot cake. I also ordered a chicken salad with pumpkin and cous cous. All of it was absolutely delicious and was enjoyed out in the courtyard in the winter sun as I read my Paddington book by Michael Bond.


After having a delicious lunch and reading a fair bit of my novel, I headed off to the museum. I paid the very affordable $6 admission fee for an adult and entered the museum. I was met with a whole lot of history about the Gold Rush era and the town of Young and the people who had lived there in times past. There was an old horse carriage and many other old devices. There were old war medals and an afternoon dress and wedding dresses. There was history about so many events and it fascinated the hell out of me.


After quite a long time wandering around the museum and reading all of the information, I headed back outside and crossed the road to the park that had been recommended to me back at the information centre. I walked through an archway with the name of the park and read a sign saying a rose garden was dedicated to someone. I walked along a gravelly path and up into a gazebo with the sunlight streaming through the gaps in the wood. The gazebo gave me a good view of the park and to the Catholic church beside it. I walked out of the gazebo and walked the length of the park.

There was a children’s birthday party happening near the end of the park and there were blue balloons everywhere. I walked back through the park opposite the Catholic church and settled on the well-mown green, soft grass and continued reading my book in the winter sun; it was just gorgeous. Then I drove to the Chinese tribute garden and parked my car there. It was only about 3km away up the road. I walked across a little bridge and past two great granite lions and a great red archway. I walked around a little path which led around the central water feature of the garden. I also passed a lovely little waterfall.

I saw there were fish in the surrounding water and one was bright orange. Having completed my circuit around the garden and finding some early spring daffodils, I settled on some grass near the dam on the other side and continued reading my book again in the winter sun. After that I drove off back to Canberra, passing a sign saying Thankyou for visiting as I did.

 

Advertisements
August 29, 2014

A Journey to 1066

Today I had a cream tea at Mrs Burton’s Restaurant and Tea Room which had all of these little square tables with blue tablecloths with lace coverings and real flowers in the centre. There were cakes in a stand too. I ate my giant scone and drank my tea from a dainty teacup and saucer whilst gazing out the window at Battle. Then I entered Battle Abbey and began my tour to the year 1066 and the Battle of Hastings with William the Conqueror of the Normans. Entry for an adult cost about £8 and came with a complimentary audio guide and map. It started with a timeline leading down through the centuries until the year 1066. Then there was an exhibition room filled with one side information, armour and weapons of the Normans, and on the other of the English. There was a film playing too showing a re-enactment of the battle. We could touch real swords, shields and armour which was fantastic. I held the handles of Norman and English swords in my hands! They were bolted to the wall though. Then I did the Battlefield Walk with my audio guide where you walk through what appears to be green, idyllic English countryside but was actually once a bloody battlefield where at least 7000 lost their lives. The walk is on a path which winds around the Battlefield perimeter with lots of information signs and posts for you to key in numbers on the audio guide to hear more information. I tried to picture the English on the hill and the Normans below on their horses fighting to the death! It felt really wild on that open field with the wind blowing fiercely across the grass and through the trees. Then after exiting the Battlefield I found what reminded me of Mary’s “Secret Garden”: a walled orchard garden! I also found hedges forming a sort of maze, an old ice dairy and a high wall to walk on back to the entrance! As I exited the abbey, musicians had begun to perform outside Mrs Burton’s Restaurant and Tea Room: magic. IMG_7851.JPGIMG_7855.JPG

IMG_7857.JPG

IMG_7853.JPG

IMG_7896.JPG

IMG_7895.JPG

IMG_7866.JPG

IMG_7877.JPG

IMG_7908.JPG

IMG_7910.JPG

IMG_7903.JPG

IMG_7901.JPG

IMG_7945.JPG

IMG_7935.JPG

IMG_7914.JPG

IMG_7956-0.JPG

IMG_7951-0.JPG

IMG_7955-0.JPG